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Real Estate Talk Last Updated: Mar 11th, 2007 - 20:12:06


Flexible Payment Mortgages - A Good Thing or Not?
By Diane Kelly
Aug 1, 2006, 10:52

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With most mortgages, your payment is the same every month. But what if your paycheck isnít so regular? Would you like to be able to vary your mortgage payment depending on your cash flow? An option ARM -- also called a flex-ARM or pick-a-payment loan -- allows you to do just that.

How does it work?
An option ARM is an adjustable-rate mortgage with a twist. You donít pay a set amount each month. Instead, the lender sends a monthly statement with up to four payment options. You simply choose the amount you want to pay that month and then submit your payment.

The options vary, but hereís the most common menu:
Minimum payment: This is calculated using an ďinitialĒ interest rate that can start as low as 1.25 percent. Because this payment is so low, itís useful for months when you donít have much cash on hand, perhaps because you are waiting for a commission or bonus check. But any unpaid interest gets deferred, or added to the principal of the loan, so your principal grows.

Interest only:
You pay all the interest due, but none of the principal. This doesnít reduce your mortgage balance, but it allows you to avoid deferring interest.

30-year amortized: This matches the monthly payment of a mortgage amortized over 30 years at your current interest rate. It includes both principal and interest.

15-year amortized: The same as above, but amortized over 15 years. This is the highest monthly payment. Choosing it allows you to reduce your principal faster than any other option.

The fine print:
The biggest caveat with option ARMs is that those enticing initial rates are short-lived. The low minimum payments that make these mortgages so attractive can increase dramatically. In addition, every five years, the loan is recast -- that is, a new amortization schedule is drawn up to ensure that the remaining balance will be paid off by the end of the loanís term. When that happens, the minimum payment can be pushed even higher.

Whatís more, if you defer too much interest, you can reach whatís called negative amortization. If your balance grows to 10 percent to 25 percent (depending on state law) greater than the original principal, your loan is automatically recast and you have to start paying the fully amortized rate, which will increase your monthly payments.

Another potential downside of option ARMs is that theyíre more complicated than most other mortgages. Home buyers may be seduced without fully understanding how much the minimum payments will increase over the long-term. When the monthly amounts go up, these people can experience payment shock.

For more information about Flexible Payment Mortgages visit the TALKCalgary home page


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